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Fact or Fiction: Shark Week Edition

Test your knowledge of the ocean's meanest beasts

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    Fact or Fiction: Baby sharks are called kitties.

    Photo: Sekundator/Shutterstock

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    Fiction! Baby sharks are called pups.

    Photo: Mohamed Shareef/Shutterstock

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    Fact or Fiction: Sharks kill more humans annually than vice versa.

    Photo: Stefan Pircher/Shutterstock

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    Fiction! Humans kill around 75 million sharks annually while only 75 shark attacks are reported.

    Photo: Stefan Pircher/Shutterstock

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    Fact or Fiction: Sharks eat breakfast, lunch and dinner just like us.

    Photo: Dray van Beeck/Shutterstock

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    Fiction! Sharks eat when they find food, regardless of time and hunger.

    Photo: Sergey Uryadnikov/Shutterstock

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    Fact or Fiction: Sharks have built in toothpaste.

    Photo: imagedb.com/Shutterstock

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    Fact! The exterior of shark teeth is made of fluoride.

    Photo: Daoart/Shutterstock

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    Fact or Fiction: Pregnant sharks go home to where they were born to give birth to their young.

    Photo: Greg Amptman/Shutterstock

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    Fact! A 2013 study concluded that soon-to-be mother sharks go home to give birth.

    Photo: Shane Gross/Shutterstock

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    Fact or Fiction: Some shark mouths can stretch up to 8 feet wide.

    Photo: Matt9122/Shutterstock

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    Fiction! Whale Shark mouths can stretch up to 15 feet wide. They have the largest mouths of all shark species.

    Photo: Stefan Pircher/Shutterstock

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    Fact or Fiction: Angel Sharks are not predators.

    Photo: Stephen Nash/Shutterstock

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    Fiction! Don't be fooled by the name. Angel Sharks are also known as sand devils because they bury themselves into piles of sand and wait for fish to pass by before attacking.

    Photo: jomejome flickr

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    Fact or Fiction: Sharks go through more than 30,000 teeth in a lifetime.

    Photo: Havoc/Shutterstock

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    Fact! On average, sharks have 45 teeth and up to seven rows of replacement teeth. They lose a lot of teeth but grow them back quickly.

    Photo: Michael Rothschild/Shutterstock

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    Fact or Fiction: The smallest species of sharks, on average, is 8 inches in length.

    Photo: stephan kerkhofs/Shutterstock

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    Fact! Pygmy Sharks are approximately 8 inches in length and can make their own light.

    Photo: Shane Gross/Shutterstock

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    Fact or Fiction: Pregnant sharks have bigger appetites than non-pregnant sharks.

    Photo: cbpix/Shutterstock

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    Fiction! Pregnant sharks will lose their appetites to assure they won't eat their babies.

    Photo: Danita Delmont/Shutterstock

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    Fact or Fiction: Sharks don't have a single bone in their bodies.

    Photo: solarseven/Shutterstock

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    Fact! A shark's skeleton is made of cartilage.

    Photo: Shane Gross/Shutterstock

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    Fact or Fiction: Sharks move like airplanes.

    Photo: IM_photo/Shutterstock

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    Fact! They create forward movement with their tails similar to propellers and water moves over their fins like wings.

    Photo: attem/Shutterstock

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    Fact or Fiction: Sharks can't tan.

    Photo: Mogens Trolle/Shutterstock

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    Fact! Sharks can tan if they swim close to the ocean's surface. Darker skin means better camouflage.

    Photo: Derek Heasley/Shutterstock

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    Fact or Fiction: Sharks are not found in the Mediterranean Ocean.

    Photo: pjmorley/Shutterstock

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    Fiction! Sharks are found in all of Earth's oceans.

    Photo: Stefan Pircher/Shutterstock

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    Fact or Fiction: Sharks have the smallest brains among fish.

    Photo: Matt9122/Shutterstock

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    Fiction! Sharks have some of the largest brains among fish.

    Photo: Sergey Uryadnikov/Shutterstock

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    Fact or Fiction: The Wobbegong Shark swallows its prey in one gulp.

    Photo: Ethan Daniels/Shutterstock

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    Fiction! The Wobbegong Shark, unlike other shark species, latches onto its prey and doesn't let go.

    Photo: KKG Photo/Shutterstock

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    Fact or Fiction: Shark fishing only became popular after the release of Jaws in 1975.

    Photo: Universal Pictures

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    Fact! Following the release of the movie, interest in shark fishing soared.

    Photo: Courtesy Everett Collection

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    Fact or Fiction: Shark cartilage can cure cancer.

    Photo: Digital Storm/Shutterstock

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    Fiction! There isn't any evidence that shark cartilage is useful in treating or preventing cancer.

    Photo: Stefan Pircher/Shutterstock

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    Fact or Fiction: The average lifespan of a shark is 50 years.

    Photo: Boris Pamikov/Shutterstock

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    Fact! While most sharks live 20-30 years, the Spiny Dogfish has the longest lifespan at more than 100 years.

    Photo: Boris Pamikov/Shutterstock